Comparing Decimals Game

Kathryn Gregory
Multiple Subject Teacher

Students will play a game in which they choose cards and choose the best place to put the number they have chosen in order to get the highest answer possible.  This should not be the first introduction to the topic.

Grade Level: 4 - 6th

Subject: Math

Length of Time: 40 - 60 Minutes

Common Core Alignment

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.5.NBT.A.3 - Read, write, and compare decimals to thousandths.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.5.NBT.A.3.B - Compare two decimals to thousandths based on meanings of the digits in each place, using >, =, and < symbols to record the results of comparisons.

Objectives & Outcomes

Students will read, write, and compare decimals to thousandths. Students will compare two decimals to thousandths based on meanings of the digits in each place, using >, =, and < symbols to record the results of comparisons.

Materials Needed

  • 1 copy of the 2 page worksheet (attached)
  • 1 deck of cards per pair of students (with Jacks, Queens and Kings removed)
  • 1 pencil

Procedure

Opening to Lesson

  • Model the game by playing you against the class for the first round.

Body of Lesson

  • Place the worksheet on the overhead and read the directions aloud with the class.
  • Since you’re the oldest, select a card from the deck (if you have not previously set aside Jacks, Queens, and Kings, do this as you play)
  • Think aloud as you choose where to place the number you selected.
    • “I chose a 3, this is a small whole number, but it’s not the smallest whole number. If I put it in the Ones place it will have a value of only 3, but if I put it in the Thousands place it will have a value of 30,000. I’m not sure what to do… Class what value with this 3 have if I put it in the Hundreds place???”
  • Call on a student to select the next card and have him decide where to put his card and state the value based on the place he chose.
    • You may wish to let him call on a friend for advice, or have students shout out where he should place the card, depending on the energy of your class and day.
  • Continue until all of the spaces are filled in.
  • Read your final number in the correct form. “My number is 67,943.421.
  • Call on a student to read the class’ number and help them to read it in correct form.
    • “Our number is 68,721.314”
  • Now ask students who has the greater number.
  • Call on students to read the entire sentence: 68,721.314 is greater than 67,943.421.
  • Now ask them which number is smaller.
  • Call on students to read the entire sentence: 67,943.421 is less than 68,721.314.
  • On page 2, write your number in the Player 1 space and the class’ number in the player 2 place. Ask them which one of the symbols belongs in the middle, <, =, or >
  • Explain that player one always writes their number in the Player 1 place and player 2 always in the player 2 place, but you will write a different symbol based on who’s number is greater.
  • Circle or highlight the greater number to show which partner won this round.
  • Give students time to play the game with their partners.
  • You may choose to have them play multiple rounds with one partner or change partners after each round.
  • The game can be modified so that the smaller number wins.

Closing

Call on students to read the results of some of the rounds of the game.

Assessment & Evaluation

Students analyze and compare the results of the game, teacher can check the comparison in part 2 of the worksheet and assess students in this way.

Modification & Differentiation

The teacher can work in with students in small groups for those who need extra assistance.

Download Attachments

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