Moody Reading: Reading with Expression

A. Wills
Multiple Subject Teacher

This lesson will be used to help students understand how to read with expression by choosing an expression to read with regardless of what is written.

Grade Level: 2 - 5th

Subject: English/Language Arts

Length of Time: Varied Depending on Usage

Common Core Alignment

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.2.4.B - Read grade-level text orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.3.4.B - Read grade-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.4.4.B - Read grade-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.5.4.B - Read grade-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings.

Objectives & Outcomes

The learners will be able to read a sentence or paragraph with a given emotion (happy, sad, angry, etc.)

Materials Needed

  • Strips of colored paper (at least five colors)
  • A text or book appropriate for the class
  • Whiteboard or overhead projector

Procedure

Opening to Lesson

  • Begin by telling students you are going to read them the same page of a book twice.
  • Ask them to quietly listen as you read the same thing and then tell them you would like to discuss the readings.
  • The first time you read the page (text of your choice), read in a monotone voice with no feeling at all.
  • Reread the passage with emotion and feeling. Ask students what was different about the two readings.
  • If students do not respond of hear the difference, guide the discussion to how reading with emotion and feeling can make a passage more interesting and hold the listeners attention.

Body of Lesson

  • Tell students that they are going to practice reading with emotion. Remind them that the words are not what is important, it is the emotion they are reading with at the time. Hand out one colored strip or paper to each student; make sure a variety is handed out.
  • On the board or overhead white each color that was handed out and assign it an emotion. (Samples shown) Demonstrate how to read the following line in each emotion (or your chosen emotions) “The dog jumped over the fence”.
  • Allow students to take turns reading in their given ‘emotion’. The goal is not to read the words as you would if you were simply trying to understand the story, but to express an emotion while reading to understand how much more interesting this can make reading.
  • *If students enjoy this activity and you want a challenge, use the colors to represent a group of people so students would read as a teacher/motivational speaker/wrestler/coach/etc. This is fun and a bit more challenging.

Closing

After everyone has had a chance to read, allow students to break into small groups of three or four. Have students choose two colors each and read through an entire text, taking turns reading in their ‘emotion’. Encourage students to read with appropriate emotions during other activities.

Assessment & Evaluation

The students will be assessed based only on participation. If the student tries to read with the emotion they have been given then they will be considered a participant.

Modification & Differentiation

If modifications are needed, try a small group to attempt this plan or a simpler text for struggling readers or students. Struggling or younger students may also benefit from hearing the book “Today I Feel Silly” by Jamie Lee Curtis.

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