Learning About Sand

Salpy Baharian, M.Ed
Teacher.org Co-Founder

This lesson is designed to help student’s discover what sand look like, how it’s made, and how can we describe it.

Grade Level: Kindergarten

Subject: Science

Length of Time: About 45 Minutes

Objectives & Outcomes

Students will be able to understand that rocks break down over time to make sand, describe what they see when they look at the sand, and use small magnifying glasses to look at the sand.

Procedure

Opening to Lesson

Explain that you have a mystery item and use the same format they use for show and tell to try and have them guess the item (a bag of sand). The three clues to give are: You find it at the ocean.  It is made up of a bunch of tiny pieces.  You can build things with it.

Body of Lesson

Opening to Lesson

Explain that you have a mystery item and use the same format they use for show and tell to try and have them guess the item (a bag of sand). The three clues to give are: You find it at the ocean.  It is made up of a bunch of tiny pieces.  You can build things with it.

Direct Teaching

After sand is guessed I will show the bag to the students and ask them if they know where you find sand in the ocean.  I will also ask them how they think sand is made.  If no one knows, I will explain how rocks hit against each other in the water and break into tiny pieces.  I will then tell the students that they are going to be scientists today.  We will talk about how scientists pay attention to details and that they should draw the sand bigger than it is.  I will tell them that their job will be to look at some sand through a magnifying glass and draw what they see.  I will explain to them how to use a magnifying glass and that they will have to be careful with them, just like scientists.

Independent Practice

Next, I will walk around the classroom with the sand and have students feel and experience the sand. Students will then discuss with their table partner what they feel and how they can describe it in as many ways as possible.

Closing

When everyone has had a turn observing and feeling the sand, bring the students back to the circle area and ask students to describe what they saw.  Use these words and descriptions to make a bubble map on the wall.

Assessment & Evaluation

Through guided questions, close monitoring and informal observation; the teacher will be able to assess student’s ability and understanding of the subject being introduced. Through individually assessing during independent practice and reviewing during guided practice the teacher will be able to evaluate students. Also, be sure to keep an eye out for anyone who is misusing the magnifying glasses.  Ask the students to describe the sand while they are at the sand table and I will also have their pictures as a representation of what they observed (though some may not be an accurate portrayal).

Modification & Differentiation

Students may work in groups or individually in order to complete their assignments. In order to accommodate for all students, allow extra time to review for lower students and extra worksheets to occupy the time of advanced students. Also, make sure that if a student’s drawing skills are weak, then ask him to describe what they see out loud.

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